CVS not updating

Perhaps an obvious one, but I attempted to do a cvs up on a directory, and nothing happened, even though there had been changes in the repository.  After being confused for a while, I noticed that there was a sticky tag:

Working revision:    1.66
   Repository revision: 1.66    /.../.../...
   Expansion option:    o
   Commit Identifier:   2104f3e32632ef7
   Sticky Tag:          1.66
   Sticky Date:         (none)
   Sticky Options:      o
   Merge From:          (none)

cvs up -A sorts this out:

cvs up -H
up: invalid option -- H
Usage: cvs update [-APCdflRp] [-k kopt] [-r rev] [-D date] [-j rev]
    [-I ign] [-W spec] [files...]
        -A Reset any sticky tags/date/kopts.
        -P      Prune empty directories.
        -C      Overwrite locally modified files with clean repository copies.
        -d      Build directories, like checkout does.
        -f      Force a head revision match if tag/date not found.
        -l      Local directory only, no recursion.
        -R      Process directories recursively.
        -p      Send updates to standard output (avoids stickiness).
        -k kopt Use RCS kopt -k option on checkout. (is sticky)
        -r rev  Update using specified revision/tag (is sticky).
        -D date Set date to update from (is sticky).
        -j rev  Merge in changes made between current revision and rev.
        -I ign  More files to ignore (! to reset).
        -W spec Wrappers specification line.

The version in the repository was 1.68, but the file was stuck at 1.66 for some reason.

Altering creation dates in image exif data

Whilst attempting to get a Kodak digital photo frame to display the photos in the correct order, I worked out how to set the creation dates to a sequential order (don’t ask).

First, install ExifTool.

Then run something like this (copy it to a file, e.g. renameFile.sh, then run renameFile.sh whilst in a directory of files to alter):

a=1
for i in *; do
	touch i
	new=$(printf "%04d.jpg" ${a}) #04 pad to length of 4
	if [ "${i}" != "${new}" ]; then
		mv ${i} ${new}
	fi

	minutes=$(( $a * 60 ))

	timeString=$(echo $minutes | awk '{printf("%s", strftime("%H:%M:%S", $1));}';)
	exiftool "-FileModifyDate=2012:03:09 $timeString" \
	"-ModifyDate=2012:03:09 $timeString" \
	"-DateTimeOriginal=2012:03:09 $timeString" \
	"-CreateDate=2012:03:09 $timeString" \
	"-DateTimeDigitized=2012:03:09 $timeString" \
	"-MetadataDate=2012:03:09 $timeString" ${new}

	let a=a+1
done

It was more complicated than it should have been, and I think there may be a bug somewhere in it.

The code just sets the time of the various dates in the exif data to a value based on the file number.  It also names the files in a sequential order.

Run MySQL commands through bash

I wanted to log some stats from MySQL.  The following outputs a few statistics (filtered with grep)

mysql -ppass -e 'SHOW STATUS;' | grep -E '(Threads|[cC]onnections)' | column -t >> $logfile;

and this one shows the current MySQL config variables which have been loaded (Useful if you want to see if a change to the config file has been loaded)

mysql -uroot -ppass -e 'show variables'

Finding out what is going on with your web server

I have been trying to debug something which I have running on an apache/mysql setup (because the max connections is being exceeded and some processes seem to hang around).  You can find out what is using port 80 with this command:

lsof -i tcp:80

And you can see what a particular command is by running this on the PID you get from the above:

ps -lf -p <PID>

I went a bit further, so the following will allow you to watch the TCP connections on port 80 and see what command is being run:

watch -d -n 1 "lsof -i tcp:80 | sort -u -k2 -n | awk '{printf \$2 \" \" \$8; if (NR != 1) {system(\"echo -ne \\\" \\\"; ps -lf -p \" \$2 \" | grep \" \$2)} else {print \" F S UID PID PPID C PRI NI ADDR SZ WCHAN STIME TTY TIME CMD\"}}' | awk '{printf \$1\"__\"substr(\$2,1,20)\"__\"\$5\"__\"\$6\"__\"\$14\"__\"\$16\"__\";for (i=17; i<=NF; i++) { printf(\"%s \", \$i)} printf(\"\n\")}' | column -t -s \"__\""

It’s a bit long, but what it is basically doing is concatenating the two commands and pretty printing it.  That command is escaped and passed into the watch command so that it updates every second.  It also highlights changes (the -d), uniqifies the output of the lsof command (| sort -u -k2 -n) so that the same process only shows once – I was getting the IP and host name both being displayed – and only displays certain columns.

Allowing CVS to recurse into subdirectories which aren’t part of CVS

Running cvs up or cvs st from a directory will recurse one directory deep.  If there are no CVS directories in these, it gives up.  To get around this, you can add a CVS directory  with an Entries file pointing to the directory you want to recurse into.  This is my example: CVS.  Replace ‘FolderToRecurseInTo’ in the Entries file with the correct folder name and put the correct repository in the repository file.  Then you can run cvs commands from the lower level directory and they will work on all the directories you specify in this way.

The CVS directory has to go in the directory above the place you run the command, pointing to the directory above that.  E.g. If you run commands from ‘/directory’, place the CVS directory in ‘/directory/meh’ and point the entries file to ‘yay’.  This will mean running cvs status in ‘/directory’ will show the status of files in the ‘/directory/meh/yay’ directory (along with any in ‘/directory/’ and directories one level up from there).

I found this useful because I can now simply run one cvs command to update all the files in my directory structure.

Meh